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Board Problems

As bar executives, we have been blessed to work with boards and committees that function smoothly and act in the best interests of the organization with a clear sense of purpose and vision. However, there are rare instances when a board or committee acts dysfunctional. The results of a dysfunctional board are often gridlock, frustration or lack of progress in achieving critical goals for the association.  A dysfunctional board can set an organization back through indecision, inaction, or inertia. Identifying the symptoms of dysfunction can help bar executives and boards alike to alleviate these problems —- creating a more productive climate to achieve the association’s objectives. The most common symptoms of dysfunction include the following.

Resources

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6 Biggest Mistakes

Leading your community responsibly isn’t an easy task, especially when you’re keeping up with board meetings, buzzwords and best practices. While board members often put forward their best effort, sometimes they still make big mistakes that can lead to serious repercussions for themselves, the board and the community itself.

8 Types of Annoying Board Members

Nonprofits are a magical place filled with super passionate hardworking and extremely Motivated individuals

8 Biggest Mistakes Board Members Make

Leading your community isn’t an easy task, especially when you’re keeping up with meetings, buzzwords, and best practices. While board members often put forward their best effort to succeed in their roles, sometimes they still make big mistakes that can result in serious repercussions for themselves, the board, and the community.

Between the Rails

The board should avoid derailments and detours. Distractions are frequent. They may come in the form of committees propose ideas that are beyond available resources. Or from directors unsure about governance so they delve into management.

Problem Boards or Board Problem?

The past twenty years have seen the steady growth of training programs, consulting practices, academic research, and guidebooks aimed at improving the performance of nonprofit boards. This development reflects both hopes and doubts about the nonprofit board. On the one hand, boards are touted as a decisive force for ensuring the accountability of nonprofit organizations.

Ineffective Board Members in a Nonprofit Organization

The individuals that choose to serve on boards do so because they want to contribute their expertise, collaborate with peers, and give back to the community. Many nonprofit organizations come across a select few that are not effectively engaged, have a lack of experience and ultimately become an ineffective board member.

Due Diligence for Directors

Guidance questions for a due diligence process for a new co-operative director

Dysfunctional Boards - Symptoms and Cures

A dysfunctional board can set an organization back through indecision, inaction or inertia. Identifying the symptoms of dysfunction can help bar executives and boards alike to alleviate these problems —- creating a more productive climate to achieve the association’s objectives.

How To Alienate the Board At Your First Meeting

Want to make a bad impression as the newest member of the board? Learn from these mistakes. The best approach: Prepare for the meetings, arrive on time, and approach the discussion by listening and working to advance the organization's mission.

Is my Board Broken?

In a meeting with association executives I asked, “Is there anything wrong with your board of directors?” I chronicled the replies and suggested solutions. Of course the purpose of a board is to govern the association. Directors serve as trustees or fiduciaries on behalf of the membership. Meetings of the board should produce outcomes.

Missing In Action: Board Meeting Attendance

1Sitting in the Shady spot Community Center boardroom, Juan, Sylvia, and Monika were fed up. Where were the other eight board members? Stefan, the board chair, should have called the meeting to order 15 minutes ago, but there were not enough individuals present to make a quorum. Juan, Sylvia, and Monika looked at each other, rolling their eyes. They were the only ones who could be counted on to attend each and every monthly meeting.

No Text Zone

Community association board members spend a lot of time communicating whether it's with one another, community members, Venders or your management company.

When Directors Go Rogue

The reputation of an organi­zation can be tarnished by a director who acts without au­thority or in defiance. For ex­ample, a person who openly criticizes the leadership or complicates with staff relations.

Surviving Turbulent Times

My president-elect was excited when he accepted the position 12 months ago. Today he’s asking, “How do I lead in difficult economic times?” Today’s economy is challenging associations. Members are scrutinizing dues, exhibitors cutting booths and sponsorships are slipping. Yet, through the decades associations have been resilient.

Excuses, Excuses, Excuses

28 Phrases You Wouldn’t Want to Hear in the Association Office

Free Riders

In economics, the free rider problem is described as a situation where some individuals in a population either consume more than their fair share of a common resource, or pay less than their fair share of the cost of a common resource.

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