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Coop Members

Ask your average co-op member what their co-op’s biggest problem is. It’s likely that they’ll say, “lack of participation”.  We think it’s time to ask if that’s true. For many co-ops there are far bigger problems – financial problems, members, and directors in arrears with their housing charges, poorly maintained buildings, lack of replacement reserves, and more. The housing co-op tradition of “member participation” could be related to these other problems, but not in the way you might think.

Resources

“The information and training materials on this website are supplied by the author and have not been edited by us. We have provided these materials as a central resource for our users, but we encourage you to carefully evaluate their relevance and accuracy for your own purposes. Please note that the views and opinions expressed in these materials do not necessarily reflect those of our organization, and we cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions they may contain. It is your responsibility to verify the accuracy and appropriateness of these materials before using them. Proper attribution to the original authors is always required when using these materials, and you should also follow any applicable copyright or licensing requirements.”

12 tips to keep your units full

Use local renters’ guides, rental websites and social media. Consider getting a co-op Facebook account. Include your location, available unit sizes (number of bedrooms and bathrooms), monthly cost, starting date and contact information. Pictures always help. Promote available units and open waiting lists on your local federation website.

Organizations Serving Cooperatives

ACE conducts an annual institute that features presentations on aspects of cooperative education, publication displays, and other data beamed to the needs of members. It issues a periodic newsletter, ACE NEWS, as a supplemental source of data about the work of members and other information related to cooperative education and training. ACE members in some regions participate in organized discussions on topics of current interest.

Managing Volunteers:

Throughout this booklet we use the word “insurer” to mean the company that takes in premium dollars and pays out money to defend and settle claims. Whatever the form of the “insurer,” the word is used interchangeably with us in this booklet. However, in some cases where we express our company philosophy or refer to a service we offer that other “insurers” do not, we use “Nonprofit Insurance Alliance” or “NIA” instead of the more generic, “insurer.”

Cooperative Growth Ecosystem

Through three groundbreaking reports funded by Citi Community Development, Building the Inclusive Economy series sets out new, cutting-edge economic development models for city leaders and community development practitioners interested in embedding equity, community wealth, and sustainability into their local economic growth plan. This series, authored by The Democracy Collaborative, The Democracy at Work Institute, and Project Equity, lays out key tools and building blocks for equitable local economic growth where all residents are able to maximize opportunities, thereby expanding urban economies where all can meaningfully participate and benefit.

Co-op Essentials

This is an educational guide for teaching basic information about cooperatives. It explains what cooperatives are—their business, principle, and structural characteriza- tions, and the responsibilities and roles of cooperative members, directors, managers, and employees.

A Leader’s Program for Youth

A committee of cooperative leaders working with youth organizations and programs asked Agricultural Cooperative Service to develop a O-month program to provide guidelines for sponsoring Scout Explorer, 4-H, Future Farmers of America, Future Home Makers, and other groups included in the 18 to 20 youth organizations with whom cooperative business leaders work. This publication is the result. This information may help cooperatives as they work with teachers, advisers, Extension agents, and others in their youth programs.

What They Are and the Role of Members

Five chapters make up this guide. Chapter 1—What Are Cooperatives?, is the most extensive chapter and generally describes where and how cooperatives fit into the American system of business, their unique principles and practices, and their defining structural characteristics, and it introduces the roles of the major cooperative participants— members, directors, manager, and employees. Chapters 2-5 go into further detail about the participants. Chapter 2 gives an overview of cooperative members, Chapter 3 describes directors, Chapter 4 discusses the cooperative manager, and Chapter 5 explains employees.

Cooperation Begins With You

Providing services to student cooperatives has been a primary focus of NASCO's operations since our inception in 1968. Each year our student cooperative members attend our Cooperative Education and Training Institute; receive visits from our professional staff for training and consulting; order books and other resource materials from our publications service; read our two newsletters, Leadership Directions and Newsbriefs; call us on the phone for impromptu problem solving; publicize the summer internship opportunities we arrange for students in co-ops and co-op organizations.

Ownership Control Rights Typology

This article examines new cooperative organizational models from an ownership rights perspective

The Cooperative Society

[Their] strategy of predicting the future does several things well: it gets our attention, it illuminates their reasoning, and it provides markers for assessing whether they will be right, or not so right. Thus, they are not merely advocating a set of values, but also taking intellectual responsibility for the assessment. This is a highly desirable combination of reasoning, innovation, and testing, which are hallmarks of the best applied social science.

Madison Community Cooperative Member Handbook

When doing your part in the co-op, try to pick things that you really want to do, because there's no point in volunteering for a task you won't enjoy (or at least won't enjoy having completed). Part of working together effectively is having a division of labor that makes sense on a personal level, not just because the factory has to run such-and-such a way. Part of self-determination is taking responsibility for your own actions, including little things like picking up after yourself. If you start something and don't finish it, make sure it's not in anyone's way

Resident Retention

You and I work in an industry which experiences major fluctuations in occupancy and those same ups and downs apply to our cash flow. When occupancy is low, we focus on leasing apartments. The pressure is really on when we have what seems to be hundreds of vacancies and only ten customers in the whole city. Ultimately the market changes, the economy improves and we are forced to refocus our efforts. We begin to breathe easy, emit a sigh of relief, just as our owner or supervisor drives up and we see that "RR" look on their face.

The Changing Landscape of Resale-Restricted, Owner-Occupied Housing

Perhaps as a result of these efforts, although unusually low interest rates and generally low unemployment rates have also played their part, homeownership rates have inched upward. By 2004, 69 percent of American households owned their own home, up from 64 percent in 1985. At the same time, particularly for lower income households and people of color, the downside of this strategy is becoming more and more apparent. Foreclosures are rising in many parts of the nation and, as recent research has shown, a disproportionately large share of lower income homeowners lose their homes, finding themselves back in the rental market a few years later.

The Road to a Resident Retention Revolution

The Road to a Resident Retention Revolution

The Charter for Social Housing Residents

We’re levelling up this country, making it fairer for everyone – and that includes making sure social housing tenants are treated with the respect they deserve.”

Active Membership In Housing Co-ops

Housing co-operatives are membership organisations. People can become their members. Their memberships are what makes them what they are. But what does this mean? Is it just that people buy a share in a housing co-op and that’s it? How does being a member of a housing co-op make any difference?

Building A Foundation For Real Member Involvement

Ask your average co-op member what their co-op’s biggest problem is. It’s likely that they’ll say, “lack of participation”. We think it’s time to ask if that’s true. For many co-ops there are far bigger problems – financial problems, members, and directors in arrears with their housing charges, poorly maintained buildings, lack of replacement reserves, and more. The housing co-op tradition of “member participation” could be related to these other problems, but not in the way you might think.

Volunteers Define Excellence

Volunteers Define Excellence

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