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Minutes

The purpose of taking minutes is to protect the organization and the people who participate in the meeting. The minutes are not intended to be a record of discussions, nor serve as a newsletter for the organization. Recent court decisions support this. In the case, Multimedia Publishing of NC v. Henderson County, the court noted, “the purpose of minutes is to provide a record of the actions taken by a board and evidence that the actions were taken according to proper procedures. If no action is taken, no minutes (other than a record that the meeting occurred) are necessary.”

Resources

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How and Why to Take Notes

Minutes, although seemly a chore, are a critical part of an organizational meeting. Minutes primarily serve as an official record of what occurred, decisions made and update those absent; but also: • ensure new group members can be brought up to speed • facilitate transparency to non-committee members • enable accountability for those present • provide a historical context for present conditions • keep people on track with action items

HOA Meeting MinUtes Do and Don't s

HOA Meeting MinUtes Do and Don't

What’s the Right Way to Approve Board Minutes?

Question: Is it OK to indicate that board meeting minutes are approved based on, “Hearing no changes, let the record reflect that the prior minutes stand as approved?” Or should a motion be made to approve? Answer: While a motion is not required to approve the minutes of the previous meeting, the board of directors should either present a motion or give unanimous consent.

Taking Minutes to Protect Organization

The purpose of taking minutes is to protect the organization and the people who participate in the meeting. The minutes are not intended to be a record of discussions, nor serve as a newsletter for the organization. Recent court decisions support this.

Mina’s Guide to Minute Taking

Minute Taking can be complex, tricky and challenging. Minute takers are often expected to produce concise and coherent summaries out of chaotic and disorganized meetings. Many are directed to take minutes without documented guidelines on what to record and what to leave out, and without a prior explanation of issues and technical terms used at a meeting. Sometimes they require a rare combination of diplomacy and fortitude, to deal effectively with demands to record inappropriate details in the minutes.

How to Record Actionable Association Meeting Minutes

How to Record Actionable Association Meeting Minutes

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